Bug #20361 mysqltest: non-equivalence of 0 and S00000 in error command
Submitted: 9 Jun 2006 14:53 Modified: 11 Jul 2006 8:04
Reporter: Paul Dubois Email Updates:
Status: No Feedback Impact on me:
None 
Category:MySQL Server: Tests Severity:S3 (Non-critical)
Version:4.1 and up OS:
Assigned to: CPU Architecture:Any

[9 Jun 2006 14:53] Paul Dubois
Description:
The SQLSTATE value 00000 means "no error," so specifying
0 or S00000 in an error command should have the same result.
This does not always occur.

How to repeat:
In these two cases, S00000 and 0 are treated the same:

% mysqltest test
--error 1051,S00000
drop table t;
drop table t;
Got one of the listed errors
ok

% mysqltest test
--error 1051,0
drop table t;
drop table t;
Got one of the listed errors
ok

In these two cases, S00000 and 0 are treated differently:

% mysqltest test
--error S00000,1051
drop table t;
drop table t;
Got one of the listed errors
ok

% mysqltest test
--error 0,1051
drop table t;
drop table t;
ok

Granted, demonstrating this bug requires relying on the
weird behavior that specifying "no error" in a multiple-error
list has different effects depending on whether "no error"
is first in the list or later in the list, but still ... :-)
[9 Jun 2006 14:53] Paul Dubois
Fixing typo in synopsis.
[11 Jul 2006 23:00] Bugs System
No feedback was provided for this bug for over a month, so it is
being suspended automatically. If you are able to provide the
information that was originally requested, please do so and change
the status of the bug back to "Open".